Downtown Albuquerque Walking Tours

Historic Albuquerque Inc.The Albuquerque Historical Society has worked with Historic Albuquerque Inc. (HAI) to develop a walking tour of downtown Central Ave and train volunteers to provide free tours. AHS & HAI received a City of Albuquerque Urban Enhancement Trust Fund grant for the project. The two key HAI volunteers are Diane Schaller and Dick Ruddy. Diane has researched the histories of many downtown businesses. Dick has done much research and collected photographs of various historic buildings, many of which were demolished.

Please note that the last tour of the season will be offered Saturday, November 19, 2016, resuming Saturday, January 7, 2017.

The free walking tours of downtown Central Avenue are normally on Saturdays, 10 – 11:30 am and meet at the corner of 1st & Central in front of Tucanos Restaurant. Reservations are not necessary except for groups over 5 people or if you would like to schedule a weekday tour. You will walk along Central Avenue from 1st Street to 8th Street. Please wear comfortable shoes and allow for one and a half to two hours for the tour. Currently, parking fees are not enforced on Saturdays at parking meters or pay boxes. There are fees at City garages and private parking lots. Tours may be canceled if temperatures are below 40°F, icy conditions exist, there is inclement weather (rain, snow) or hazardous, weather-related driving conditions.

Call (505) 289-0586 and leave a message for more information or to arrange a special tour time.

We also offer a presentation through our Speakers Bureau entitled “The Downtown Walking Tour: For People Who Prefer to Sit”. Roland Penttila has created a PowerPoint slide show of the walking tour for people who can’t stand for two hours or walk the ¾ mile distance. It is all the knowledge the tour contains without the steps. It is a perfect alternative for those unable to get around. The presentation lasts about 90 minutes. The presentation tells about Central Avenue (previously Railroad Avenue) and the changes that occurred when the railroad came to town in 1880 all the way up to the present day. The history is supported with vintage photos of the buildings–many of which no longer exist. For more information or to schedule a presentation visit our Speakers Bureau page.

Learn more about Albuquerque’s historic landmarks.